ECSOS - C++ Entity Component System based on Ordered Sets

A data-oriented header-only C++14 library

Bas Geertsema

During the development of my game I have created an entity-component-system (ECS). I decided to extract the functionality into a generic library as it might be useful for other (game) developers as well. The library is named ECSOS and is now available on GitHub. ECSOS is a small header-only C++14 library that provides a data-oriented entity-component-system (ECS) based on ordered sets. By default it uses the boost flat_set container, which stores set elements (components) in a cache-friendly contiguous array, although other (custom) containers might be used.

Bas Geertsema

Just two days ago Epic announced that you can use their powerful Unreal Engine 4 with no upfront costs. And a 5% revenue fee is only collected when your gross is over $3.000,- per quarter. This used to be $100.000 per developer seat just a couple of years ago. One day later, Unity announced that they basically give away their engine for free with their personal edition. Only when your revenue/funding exceeds $100.000, you will have to pay.

Bas Geertsema

In the last months I have been working on a video game. In the early development days I made some choices regarding the technologies to use. Here I want to talk specifically about my choice to go with low-level languages and low-level components, rather than a high-level game-engine such as Unity. A polished design The market for video games is huge, but pretty saturated. So, how does one stand out among the crowd?

Bas Geertsema

I have been experimenting with the D programming language over the past couple of weeks. D is a native language and was conceived by Walter Bright. Although the language itself has been in development for many years already, it seems that it has been getting more traction over the last couple of years. The name D hints already at it’s reason d’etre: to be a better C++. Because of endless backwards compatibility and decades of evolution the C++ language has grown..

Bas Geertsema

We as programmers like to think otherwise, but we are by no means perfect. We do make mistakes all the time. One of the most important traits of a good programmer is to recognize this and, more importantly, to act upon it. If one takes on a development endeavor there is one obvious path that also happens to be the most error-prone. It is this path: you have an idea, you code, you startup your app, click through it once and you’re finished.